Parents club

October 15th 2016

After analyzing the various comments and responses from users of Parents club on Flinnt platform, we have decided to offer a private course on Flinnt on effective learning. This is because, learning related problems are highlighted by the participants. To enable the participants to preview the course, we are giving a few videos for preview. We are confident, you will like what you see, our approach to the course offering.

Video preview o1: Vision-01

 

Video Preview 02: Are you on the right path?

 

Video 03: Are you clear about your current assets?

 

 

August 20th

Overscheduling Your Child

Parents often line up a slew of activities, like dance or music classes. Then they wonder why their child isn’t getting in bed and falling asleep right away after so many activities that must have made her tired.

The problem, Altmann says, is that they’re still wound up and need time to calm down. Every child needs down time, especially preschoolers, she says. Whether your child is at preschool for two hours or there all day, it can be very exhausting.

Fix it: Don’t overschedule your child or shuttle him from one activity to the next. Give your child time to unwind with free play when he gets home from school.

Want to know more? Click on https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSepy1JexH2jYYvLrGGABo4DZ0SdU8_5-og8iN95WQ4D3guFCQ/viewform?usp=send_form ,

register for free counselling and get the answers to the questions you have…

 

–Progressive talents Team

August 19th

Encouraging Whining

Does your child’s whining drive you crazy? For instance, does it drive you up the wall when, right before dinnertime while getting ready to preparing food, your child starts crying, “I wanna go to the park,” or “I wanna go play with Riley.”

mistakes-parents make-05The expert says “parents often give in to these whines, but this only reinforces the attention-getting behavior. Your child will figure out which buttons to push and then push them over and over again”.

 

“This is the age when your children come out of their shells,” the expert says. “Watch out, because they figure out what works.”

Fix it: Ignore it.

For behavior that isn’t aggressive, like a whine or sulk, you’re better off if you don’t respond to it at all. If you’re consistent, the expert says, your child will think, “Well, that didn’t work.”

Want to know more? Click on https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSepy1JexH2jYYvLrGGABo4DZ0SdU8_5-og8iN95WQ4D3guFCQ/viewform?usp=send_form ,

register for free counselling and get the answers to the questions you have…

 

–Progressive talents Team

August 18th

Missing the warning signs:

Purposeful parenting-01Parents often try to reason with children when they’re in the throes of a temper tantrum, repeating, “Calm down, calm down.” But that’s like trying to reason with a goldfish, Borba says. “You’ve got power immediately beforehand when you can still distract or anticipate. But once the tantrum is in full force, you’ve lost it. The kid is not hearing you.”

 

Fix it: “Figure out and anticipate what your kid’s natural warning signs are”, Borba says. “The usual ones are hunger, fatigue, and boredom”.

 

So don’t take your child to the supermarket unless she’s napped or you’ve stashed a healthy snack in your purse.

Want to know more? Click on https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSepy1JexH2jYYvLrGGABo4DZ0SdU8_5-og8iN95WQ4D3guFCQ/viewform?usp=send_form ,

register for free counselling and get the answers to the questions you have…

–Progressive talents Team

August 17th

Focusing on the Negative

House Rules-kids-01             It’s easy to hone in on your child’s negative actions — like yelling and screaming — and ignore the good ones.

 

Altmann says parents tend to focus on what they don’t want their preschoolers to do. “They’ll say, ‘Don’t hit. Don’t throw. Don’t say ‘poopy pants,'” she says.

 

Fix it:

Notice when your child is doing something positive, and reward the good behavior.

 

The reward for positive actions can be your praise, or it can be giving your child a big hug or kiss. “Those types of things really go a long way with preschoolers,” Altmann says.

 

Tell your child, “I like the way you sat quietly and listened,” or “That was good when you were so friendly to the child on the playground.”

 

Want to know more? Click on https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSepy1JexH2jYYvLrGGABo4DZ0SdU8_5-og8iN95WQ4D3guFCQ/viewform?usp=send_form ,

register for free counselling and get the answers to the questions you have…

 

–Progressive talents Team

August 16th

Sometimes, it may seem like your preschooler has the innate ability to push you to the outer edge of your patience. And that’s on a good day.

dirty baby

dirty baby

Fear not, moms and dads. You’re not alone. Preschoolers want to own their newfound independence. But they also want the close attention and love of their caregivers.

What are the common mistakes parents of preschoolers make and what are some smart fixes to help avoid or resolve problems? Can you give your suggestions/ comments in the comments section?

Straying Too Much From Routines

Parenting Preschoolers-02Consistency is key for preschoolers, says pediatrician Tanya Remer Altmann, author of Mommy Calls: Dr. Tanya Answers Parents’ Top 101 Questions about Babies and Toddlers.

When you’re not being consistent with your routine, preschoolers get confused and may act out more or throw more temper tantrums. Altmann says, “If sometimes you let them do something and sometimes you don’t, they don’t understand.”

Your child probably wants to know why last time Mommy let her play on the playground for 10 minutes when school got out but this time wants her to get in the car right away. Or why did Mommy lay down with her for 10 minutes last night while she fell asleep but now says she can’t.

Fix it: Be consistent across the board — whether it’s with discipline, sleep habits, or mealtime routines.

Altmann says if your routine is consistent 90% of the time and your child is doing well, then so are you, and a minor exception may be OK.

Want to know more? Click on https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSepy1JexH2jYYvLrGGABo4DZ0SdU8_5-og8iN95WQ4D3guFCQ/viewform?usp=send_form ,

register for free counselling and get the answers to the questions you have…

–Progressive talents Team

 

August 15th

Happy independence day to you all from Progressive Talents Team. We are very happy to present a few facts that you may or may not be aware of about the independence day in the attached video. View the video and enjoy your independence!!

August 14th

How do you teach your children to respect you, other adults, and their teachers? And what about showing respect for themselves? In today’s informal society many children address adults by their first names. And some parents try much too hard to be their children’s friends. What is right? What is wrong?

 Respect-Teach-01

Some tips I suggest for fostering respectfulness in your child include:

1. Respect your child so that he can respect himself. Use kind words to address him, no matter how upset you may be. You can correct and discipline without criticizing, degrading, or belittling.

2. Discuss respect. Use storylines from books and TV shows as teaching opportunities. Admire others who are respectful and acknowledge acts of respect that you see in the community.

From <http://forums.webmd.com/3/parenting-exchange/forum/3720>

August 13th

Thumb sucking-2-oh-flip-chartppfinal-19-638Don’t nag or punish. Unless your child really wants to stop biting his nails, you probably can’t do much about it. Like other nervous habits, nail-biting tends to be unconscious.

If your child doesn’t even know he’s doing it, nagging and punishing him are pretty useless strategies. Even adults have a terrible time breaking habits like this.

If the habit really bothers you, set limits. “No nail-biting at the dinner table” is as reasonable a rule as “no feeding the dog from your plate.”

The most important thing is to keep what’s basically a nuisance from escalating into a heated issue or becoming charged with emotion. Stifling your irritation for as long as you can and then snapping, “Stop biting your nails! I can’t stand it!” may turn out be the opening shot in a long and exhausting power struggle.

In general, as long as your child’s not hurting himself and doesn’t seem overly stressed out, your best bet is to keep his fingernails neatly trimmed, remind him to wash his hands often, and try to keep your attention focused elsewhere. If you pressure him to stop, you’ll just add to his stress and risk intensifying the behavior.

Moreover, any direct intervention on your part – such as painting nasty-tasting solutions on his fingernails – will feel like a punishment to him, whether you mean it that way or not. The less fuss he associates with the habit, the more likely he is to stop on his own when he’s ready, and the more likely he is to feel comfortable asking you for help.

August 12th 2016

Purposeful parenting-01Address her anxieties. “Our initial response when children do something that worries us is to try to stop the behavior, and that’s fine as a long-term goal,” says parenting educator Janis Keyser, co-author of Becoming the Parent You Want to Be. But before you can do that, it’s essential that you deal with the underlying causes of the behavior and think about whether there’s stress in your child’s life that you need to address.”

If you have an idea about what might be making your child anxious – a recent move, a divorce in the family, a new school, or an upcoming piano recital – make a special effort to help her talk about her worries. This is easier said than done for most kids, of course, but suggesting a patently ridiculous reason for the nail-biting (“I know! You’re trying to sharpen your teeth!”) may prompt her to tell you what’s really bothering her.

 

 

August 11th 2016

Nail biting- oral-habits-30-638Your big kid will change a lot between the ages of 5 to 8. We would like to find out more about the physical, social and emotional, and speech and language developmental milestones to expect from older kids and also get ideas on tackling the tough topics, dealing with discipline, ending the bedtime battles, and solving behavior problems like tattling, teasing, and talking back.

Do you have any ideas to feed us all? Give your suggestions in the comments section.

One of the behavior problems we thought of was ‘biting nails’,

Why kids bite their nails

Your child may bite his nails for any number of reasons – curiosity, boredom, stress relief, habit, or imitation. Nail-biting is the most common of the so-called “nervous habits,” which include thumb-sucking, nose picking, hair twisting or tugging, and teeth grinding. It’s also the one most likely to continue into adulthood. How to take care?

 

August 10th 2016

How to say ‘NO’? Say it like you mean it

House Rules-kids-01Of course, when her behavior does matter, and you really do need to say no, don’t waffle. Say it firmly (but calmly), with conviction and a poker face – “No! Don’t pull the cat’s tail.” An amused “No, no, sweetie” sends your preschooler mixed messages and certainly won’t discourage her. When she responds, give her a smile or a hug and follow up with something affirmative – “Yes! What a good listener you are!”

Written for United Kingdom

Approved by the Baby Centre Medical Advisory Board

 

August 9th 2016

How to say ‘NO’?  Ignore minor infractions

Respect-Teach-01Life presents plenty of meaningful opportunities to teach your child discipline. Don’t go looking for extras. If she’s splashing in a puddle and you’re on your way home anyway, why not let her? If she wants to wear her favourite T-shirt to bed, what’s the harm? Choose your battles. Indulge her sense of adventure, fun and exploration whenever you can. If she’s safe and you don’t have to say no, let it slide.

Written for United Kingdom

Approved by the Baby Centre Medical Advisory Board

 

August 8th 2016

How to say ‘NO’? Avoid the issue

House Rules-kids-01Whenever you can, keep your preschooler out of situations where you’ll have to say no, and opt instead for safe environments that encourage her sense of adventure and curiosity. Your home should still be conscientiously childproofed, with dangerous and valuable items kept out of her reach. And choose places where she’s free to roam – the playground or your sister’s big garden, for instance, over the glassware section in a department store or Great-Grandma Elsie’s antique-filled home. And if you’re food shopping, try to avoid the sweet aisle.

You can’t isolate your child from all situations where you’ll have to say no, of course, but life will be easier for both of you – and you’ll be able to say yes more often – if you limit them.

Keep in mind, though, that many preschoolers enjoy shopping and will behave quite well – if you take a few precautions. Plan shopping trips for times when your child is well rested, and don’t overdo it – an hour or two at the shopping center is plenty.

Written for United Kingdom

Approved by the Baby Centre Medical Advisory Board

 

August 7th 2016

How to say ‘NO’? Drive her to distraction

28b8bdb210a8189c272c834eeb8e74e1Even a preschooler can be easily distracted from trouble. When a delicate figurine catches her eye in the department store, quickly point out how the light reflects in a mirror across the aisle, or divert her with a question (“What should we have for lunch?”), a toy, or a little snack. Meanwhile, keep her out of the way of temptation. Older preschoolers are easier than younger children to shop with, and more receptive to up-front distraction, too: “We can’t play with that china doll, but we can try out the wind-up toys over here.”

Written for United Kingdom

Approved by the Baby Centre Medical Advisory Board

 

August 06 2016

How to say ‘NO’?  

Offer options

c180770d9f08231364c50a8995621800Your preschooler wants to feel independent and in control. So rather than issuing a flat-out denial when she begs for some chocolate before lunch, offer her a choice between halved grapes and apple slices. Or let her pick a treat that she can eat after lunch. If she typically insists on wearing an out-of-the-question outfit (like a bathing suit in December), give her two acceptable outfits to choose between each morning. Though she may not be thrilled with the choices you’ve offered her, she will eventually learn to accept them

Written for United Kingdom

Approved by the Baby Centre Medical Advisory Board

 

August 5th 2016

How to say ‘NO’ to the child?

ca267fa8b0968b7a3e3c16fe86c5df34Rephrase

Put a positive spin on your request. Instead of saying no, tell her clearly what she can do instead. Rather than barking, “No! Don’t throw the ball in the living room,” for instance, try “See if you can roll the ball down the hall”. If she’s in the middle of an art project and is getting glue all over the floor, help her put newspaper down under her work. This gives her something to do rather than something to stop doing. When you have to act quickly to keep her safe, substitute a more direct warning, such as “Stop!” or “Hot!”

Written for United Kingdom

Approved by the Baby Centre Medical Advisory Board

 

August 4th 2016

 

We are currently looking at various ways we can tell “NO” to the child, so that he listens and obeys! Click on the image to see one way of communicating to the child.

One alternative way suggested is:
Offer options
Your preschooler wants to feel independent and in control. So rather than issuing a flat-out denial when she begs for some chocolate before lunch, offer her a choice between halved grapes and apple slices. Or let her pick a treat that she can eat after lunch. If she typically insists on wearing an out-of-the-question outfit (like a bathing suit in December), give her two acceptable outfits to choose between each morning. Though she may not be thrilled with the choices you’ve offered her, she will eventually learn to accept them
Written for United Kingdom
Approved by the Baby Center Medical Advisory Board

Read the image message by clicking on the message:

Say-NO-03

 

We are still awaiting your suggestions. More you suggest more fun it will be. Please do participate by giving suggestions in the comments section

August 3rd 2016

Another alternative suggested by the experts to say “NO” is:

“Drive her to distraction”‘

Even a preschooler can be easily distracted from trouble. When a delicate figurine catches her eye in the department store, quickly point out how the light reflects in a mirror across the aisle, or divert her with a question (“What should we have for lunch?”), a toy, or a little snack. Meanwhile, keep her out of the way of temptation. Older preschoolers are easier than younger children to shop with, and more receptive to up-front distraction, too: “We can’t play with that china doll, but we can try out the wind-up toys over here.”

Written for United Kingdom
Approved by the Baby Centre Medical Advisory Board

Click on the image to get the message

1f75fa2d24e789598ff2e51cdf2ce137

 

COMMENTS FORM


August 2nd 2016

This is a good activity game to keep your child occupied. Find out how to play!

Click on the image to know how to play

How to play 02

Yesterday we asked you to suggest alternative approaches of telling “NO” to your child. Here we have one suggestion

Rephrase
Put a positive spin on your request. Instead of saying no, tell her clearly what she can do instead. Rather than barking, “No! Don’t throw the ball in the living room,” for instance, try “See if you can roll the ball down the hall”. If she’s in the middle of an art project and is getting glue all over the floor, help her put newspaper down under her work. This gives her something to do rather than something to stop doing. When you have to act quickly to keep her safe, substitute a more direct warning, such as “Stop!” or “Hot!”
Written for United Kingdom
Approved by the Baby Centre Medical Advisory Board

COMMENTS FORM

August 1st

This is a good memory game to keep your child occupied on car journeys, in restaurants, or anywhere that requires her to sit still. Click on the image and find out how to play!

how to play-01

Alternative ways to say “NO”….
Maybe your preschooler ignores the word “no,” or maybe you’d just like to take a more positive approach to disciplining her. Luckily, there are plenty of alternatives to this overused command – and for good reason. Children often become immune to the word, and you may find that it takes ten NOs to get your child to respond. Whether you’re trying to keep your preschooler out of trouble or teach her right from wrong, try a better, more effective approach than the “n” word. What approaches do you suggest?

Can you send us your suggestions in the comments section? We will be happy…

COMMENTS FORM

-Progressive talents Team